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Pseudirenaeus

By: Pseud?Irenaeus

Excerpt: [A.D. 177.] This letter should have been made a preface to the works of Irenaeus, or at least an appendix. It is worthy of his great name; ?the finest thing of the kind in all antiquity,? says Lardner. Critics of no mean name have credited it to Irenaeus; but, as this cannot be proved, I have accordingly marked it as a pseudonym. The same writer condenses the arguments of others, on which he decides to adhere to the later chronology of Eusebius, assigning its da...

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Jibaro Death

By: Maxwell Grant

Excerpt: THE man who alighted from a cab in front of the Hotel Goliath was a foreigner. That was apparent from the olive hue of his skin; the jet blackness of his glistening hair, and the dark glint of his eyes. His exact nationality, however, would have been difficult to guess. The man?s expression showed odd contrasts. The flash of his eyes; the set of his lips; the strength of his squatty frame were indicative of a person who could combat danger. Nevertheless, his eye...

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An Enemy of the People

By: Henrik Ibsen

Dr. Thomas Stockmann, Medical Officer of the Municipal Baths. Mrs. Stockmann, his wife. Petra (their daughter) a teacher. Ejlif & Morten (their sons, aged 13 and 10 respectively). Peter Stockmann (the Doctor’s elder brother), Mayor of the Town and Chief Constable, Chairman of the Baths’ Committee, etc. Morten Kiil, a tanner (Mrs. Stockmann’s adoptive father). Hovstad, editor of the People’s Messenger. Billing, sub-editor. Captain Horster. Aslaksen, a printer. Men of vari...

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The Works of Rudyard Kipling

By: Rudyard Kipling

CONTENTS VOLUME I DEPARTMENTAL DITTIES AND OTHER VERSES DEPARTMENTAL DITTIES Prelude General Summary Army Headquarters Study of an Elevation, in Indian Ink A Legend of the Foreign Office The Story of Uriah The Post that Fitted Public Waste Delilah What Happened Pink Dominoes The Man Who Could Write Municipal A Code of Morals The Last Department...

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Morton Hall

By: Elizabeth Gaskell

Excerpt: Chapter One. Our old Hall is to be pulled down, and they are going to build streets on the site. I said to my sister, ?Ethelinda! if they really pull down Morton Hall, it will be a worse piece of work than the Repeal of the Corn Laws.? And, after some consideration, she replied, that if she must speak what was on her mind, she would own that she thought the Papists had something to do with it; that they had never forgiven the Morton who had been with Lord Montea...

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Rose Face

By: H.A. Lamb

Excerpt: MY MASTER and Jani Beg, the Uzbek, had been at drawn swords. Jani Beg had built a tower of the skulls of my master?s retainers that he had slain. On the other hand, Shirzad Mir, who was my master, had taken prisoner the son of Jani Beg, who was called ?

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His Unconquerable Enemy

By: W. C. Morrow

I was summoned from Calcutta to the heart of India to perform a difficult surgical operation on one of the women of a great rajah's household. I found the rajah a man of a noble character, but possessed, as I afterward discovered, of a sense of cruelty purely Oriental and in contrast to the indolence of his disposition. He was so grateful for the success that attended my mission that he urged me to remain a guest at the palace as long as it might please me to stay, and I...

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The Isle of Doubt

By: Maxwell Grant

The words were uttered by a man who was seated at a table in a tiny, gloomy room. A shaded lamp in the corner provided the sole illumination, and the dim light showed only the speaker's back. The man at the table was listening intently through a pair of ear phones which were attached to his head. Await reply. Burbank spoke in a quiet tone, after receiving the message over the wire. His hands stretched to the wall and manipulated the plugs of a small switchboard. A click ...

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Faraday as a Discoverer

By: John Tyndall

Preface: Daily and weekly, from all parts of the world, I receive publications bearing upon the practical applications of electricity. This great movement, the ultimate outcome of which is not to be foreseen, had its origin in the discoveries made by Michael Faraday, sixty?two years ago. From these discoveries have sprung applications of the telephone order, together with various forms of the electric telegraph. From them have sprung the extraordinary advances made in el...

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The Golden Scorpion

By: Sax Rohmer

I often stopped for a chat at this point and I was acquainted with most of the men of P. division on whom the duty devolved from time to time. It was a lonely spot at night when the residents in the neighborhood had retired, so that the darkened houses seemed to withdraw yet farther into the gardens separating them from the highroad. A relic of the days when trains and motor-buses were not, dusk restored something of an old-world atmosphere to the village street, disguis...

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Some Poems by Sir Walter Scott

By: Sir Walter Scott, 1st Baronet

Introduction: Since there is room in this volume for more verses than Colonel Hay?s {1}, I have added to them a few poems by Sir Walter Scott; the first written in 1811 at the time of the struggle with Napoleon in the Peninsula, the second in 1815, after Waterloo. Thus there is over all this volume a thin haze of battle through which we see only the finer feelings and the nobler hopes of man. The day is to come when war shall be no more, but wars have been and may again ...

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The Upanishads, Volume I

By: F. Max Muller

'The general inclinations which are naturally implanted in my soul to some religion, it is impossible for me to shift off: but there being such a multiplicity of religions in the world, I desire now seriously to consider with my self which of them all to restrain these my general inclinations to. And the reason of this my enquiry is not, that I am in the least dissatisfied with that religion I have already embraced; but because 'tis natural for all men to have an overbea...

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The Policy of the International

By: Michael Bakunin

Up to now, says [the 13 July 1869 issue of La Montagne, we thought that a person's political and religious opinions did not affect his standing as a member of the International; as for us, we maintain that point of view. At first glance, we might think Mr. Coullery to be correct. For indeed, when the International welcomes a new member into its bosom, it does not ask him whether he is an atheist or a believer, or whether he belongs to any particular political party. It a...

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The Rich Mrs. Burgoyne

By: Kathleen Norris

Annie, what are you doing? Polishing the ramekins? Oh, that's right. Did the extra ramekins come from Mrs. Brown? Didn't! Then as soon as the children come back I'll send for them; I wish you'd remind me. Did Mrs. Binney come? and Lizzie? Oh, that's good. Where are they? Down in the cellar! Oh, did the extra ice come? Will you find out, Annie? Those can wait. If it didn't, the mousse is ruined, that's all! No, wait, Annie, I'll go out and see Celia myself. Little Mrs. Ge...

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The Distressed Wife

By: John Gay

ACT I. SCENE I. Sir Thomas Willit, Mr. Barter. Bart. Why did you bring her to Town at all? Why did not you pack her off into the Country three Months ago? Sir Tho. But to fall upon the Sex in so severe a Manner looks like Pique. You old Batchelors should not judge of all Women by those you have convers'd with.

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The Anti-Slavery Crusade

By: Jesse Macy

CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTION: The Emancipation Proclamation of President Lincoln marks the beginning of the end of a long chapter in human history. Among the earliest forms of private property was the ownership of slaves. Slavery as an institution had persisted throughout the ages, always under protest, always provoking opposition, insurrection, social and civil war, and ever bearing within itself the seeds of its own destruction. Among the historic powers of the world the Un...

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Kew Gardens

By: Virginia Woolf

Excerpt: FROM the oval?shaped flower?bed there rose perhaps a hundred stalks spreading into heart?shaped or tongue?shaped leaves half way up and unfurling at the tip red or blue or yellow petals marked with spots of colour raised upon the surface; and from the red, blue or yellow gloom of the throat emerged a straight bar, rough with gold dust and slightly clubbed at the end. The petals were voluminous enough to be stirred by the summer breeze, and when they moved, the r...

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Absolute Spirit

By: Georg Hegel

The concept of the spirit has its reality in the spirit. If this reality is in completed identity with that concept as the knowledge of the absolute idea, then the necessary aspect is that the implicitly free intelligence liberates itself for its concept, in order for it to be a shape worthy of it. The subjective and the objective spirit can therefore be seen as the path on which this side of reality or existence forms itself (¤ 304). Conversely, this path also has the s...

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Character

By: Samuel Smiles

Excerpt: Character is one of the greatest motive powers in the world. In its noblest embodiments, it exemplifies human nature in its highest forms, for it exhibits man at his best. Men of genuine excellence, in every station of life ? men of industry, of integrity, of high principle, of sterling honesty of purpose ? command the spontaneous homage of mankind. It is natural to believe in such men, to have confidence in them, and to imitate them. All that is good in the wor...

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Charlie to the Rescue

By: R.M. Ballantyne

Excerpt: Chapter One. Introduces the Hero. To be generally helpful was one of the chief points in the character of Charlie Brooke. He was evidently born to aid mankind. He began by helping himself to everything in life that seemed at all desirable. This was natural, not selfish. At first there were few things, apparently, that did seem to his infant mind desirable, for his earliest days were marked by a sort of chronic crossness that seemed quite unaccountable in one so ...

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