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Out of the Storm

By: William Hope Hodgson

Excerpt: ?Hush!? said my friend the scientist, as I walked into his laboratory. I had opened my lips to speak; but stood silent for a few minutes at his request. He was sitting at his instrument, and the thing was tapping out a message in a curiously irregular fashion stopping a few seconds, then going on at a furious pace.

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Nix's Mate : An Historical Romance of America, Volume 2

By: Rufus Dawes

We now return to the metropolis of New-England. Horace Seymour had at last entirely regained his strength, and was once more entering upon the hopes, wishes, and daily occupations of the busy world. Nor had the interim of his indisposition disqualified him from pursuing those studies in which he most delighted. Having just graduated at Harvard University, he had entered as a law student in his uncle's office, where, under the guidance of Mr. Wilmer, he was making as rapi...

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The Boys' and Girls' Plutarch

By: John S. White

As geographers crowd into the edges of their maps parts of the world which they do not know about, adding notes in the margin to the effect that beyond this lies nothing but sandy deserts full of wild beasts, unapproachable bogs, Seythian ice, or frozen sea, so, in this great work of mine, in which I have compared the lives of the greatest men with one another, after passing through those periods which probable reasoning can reach to and real history find a footing in, I...

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The Red Rover, Volume 1

By: James Fenimore Cooper

The Writer felt it necessary, on a former occasion, to state, that, in sketching his marine life, he did not deem himself obliged to adhere, very closely, to the chronological order of nautical improvements. It is believed that no very great violation of dates will be found in the following pages. If any keen-eyed critic of the ocean, however, should happen to detect a rope rove through the wrong leading-block, or a term spelt in such a manner as to destroy its true soun...

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Resurrection

By: Leo Tolstoy, Graf

Opinions about Tolstoy and his work differ, but on one point there surely might be unanimity. A writer of world-wide reputation should be at least allowed to know how to spell his own name. Why should any one insist on spelling it Tolstoi (with one, two or three dots over the i), when he himself writes it Tolstoy? The only reason I have ever heard suggested is, that in England and America such outlandish views are attributed to him, that an outlandish spelling is desirable to match those views.

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The Monster Men

By: Edgar Rice Burroughs

Excerpt: 1. The RIFT As he dropped the last grisly fragment of the dismembered and mutilated body into the small vat of nitric acid that was to devour every trace of the horrid evidence which might easily send him to the gallows, the man sank weakly into a chair and throwing his body forward upon his great, teak desk buried his face in his arms, breaking into dry, moaning sobs. Beads of perspiration followed the seams of his high, wrinkled forehead, replacing the tears w...

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Ridgeway

By: Scian Dubh

Introduction: In the dark, English crucible of seven hundred years of famine, fire and sword, the children of Ireland have been tested to an intensity unknown to the annals of any other people. From the days of the second Henry down to those of the last of the Georges, every device that human ingenuity could encompass or the most diabolical spirit entertain, was brought to bear upon them, not only with a view to insuring their speedy degradation, but with the further des...

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Fisher's Capital and Income

By: Thorstein B. Veblen

The Nature of Capital and Income (1) is of that class of books that have kept the guild of theoretical economists content to do nothing toward the increase and diffusion of knowledge during the past quarter of a century. Of this class Mr Fisher's work is of the best — thoughtful, painstaking, sagacious, exhaustive, lucid, and tenaciously logical. What it lacks is the breath of life; and this lack it shares with the many theoretical productions of the Austrian diversion a...

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Janice Meredith

By: Paul Leicester Ford

My dear George: Into the warp and woof of every book an author weaves much that even the subtlest readers cannot suspect, far less discern. To them it is but a cross and pile of threads interlaced to form a pattern which may please or displease their taste. But to the writer every filament has its own association: How each bit of silk or wool, flax or tow, was laboriously gathered, or was blown to him; when each was spun by the wheel of his fancy into yarns; the colour a...

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Dawn

By: H. Rider Haggard

Excerpt: ?You lie; you always were a liar, and you always will be a liar. You told my father how I spent the money.? ?Well, and what if I did? I had to look after myself, I suppose. You forget that I am only here on sufferance, whilst you are the son of the house. It does not matter to you, but he would have turned me out of doors,? whined George. ?Oh! curse your fine words; it?s you who forget, you swab. Ay, it?s you who forget that you asked me to take the money to the...

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Containing Various Sections of the Works

Excerpt: From the Two Books on the Promises.(1) I. But as they produce a certain composition by Nepos,(2) on which they insist very strongly, as if it demonstrated incontestably that there will be a (temporal) reign of Christ upon the earth, I have to say, that in many other respects I accept the opinion of Nepos, and love him at once for his faith, and his laboriousness, and his patient study in the Scriptures, as also for his great efforts in psalmody,(3) by which even...

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Man and Wife

By: Wilkie Collins

Excerpt: THE name of one was Blanche. The name of the other was Anne. Both were the children of poor parents, both had been pupil?teachers at the school; and both were destined to earn their own bread. Personally speaking, and socially speaking, these were the only points of resemblance between them. Blanche was passably attractive and passably intelligent, and no more. Anne was rarely beautiful and rarely endowed. Blanche?s parents were worthy people, whose first consid...

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Problem of the Red Rose

By: Jacques Futrelle

Excerpt: Through the open windows of a pleasantly sunny little sitting room a lazy breath of early summer drifted in, and gently stirred the wayward hair of a girl who leaned forward over a small writing desk with her head resting upon one white fore arm, and he

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Knife in the Dark

By: Robert Leslie Bellem

Excerpt: Chapter 1. Dead Passenger The PILOT knew his trade. I scarcely felt the big airliner?s wheels touch the ground. There was no shock, no bounce, no sense of transition from airborne to earthbound. The night was as dark as a pocket in perdition and the storm that had threatened us all the way south from San Francisco was a steady drench now that we had landed in L.A. But at least we had landed, rain or no rain, and presently I would be finding out why the agency ha...

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The Question How

By: William Hanna Thomson

Excerpt: IN one of Carlyle?s earliest productions, dealing with the philosophy of Clothes, he showed that a man quite plainly reveals his inner self by what he wears. So we would now discuss what the being, Man, reveals about himself by his eternal question, ?How?? As language is a lofty endowment and, moreover, on this earth exclusively human, we would lead up to the subject by stating what the parts of speech are. According to the Arabs, who surpass all other peoples i...

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Strife

By: John Galsworthy

It is noon. In the Underwoods' dining-room a bright fire is burning. On one side of the fireplace are double-doors leading to the drawing-room, on the other side a door leading to the hall. In the centre of the room a long dining-table without a cloth is set out as a Board table. At the head of it, in the Chairman's seat, sits JOHN ANTHONY, an old man, big, cleanshaven, and high-coloured, with thick white hair, and thick dark eyebrows. His movements are rather slow and f...

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Marked Murder

By: Norman A. Daniels

Trooper Bill Kent, on patrol duty. heard the car roaring up behind him. He twisted his head, looked through the rear window and saw the car heading toward him. It was doing at least seventy. The fool, Kent muttered. He must be blind drunk not to see this white cruiser of mine. I've got to worry about him getting past me before I can hope to catch him. Kent pulled far over to one side and slowed down considerably, but his right foot stayed on the gas pedal, just in case t...

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The Aeneid

By: Virgil

Excerpt: BOOK I. Arms, and the man I sing, who, forc?d by fate, And haughty Juno?s unrelenting hate, Expell?d and exil?d, left the Trojan shore. Long labors, both by sea and land, he bore, And in the doubtful war, before he won The Latian realm, and built the destin?d town; His banish?d gods restor?d to rites divine, And settled sure succession in his line, From whence the race of Alban fathers come, And the long glories of majestic Rome.

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Against Hermogenes

By: Tertullian

WE are accustomed, for the purpose of shortening argument, -- (1) to lay down the rule against heretics of the lateness of their date. -- (2) For in as far as by our rule, priority is given to the truth, which also foretold that there would be heresies, in so far must all later opinions be prejudged as heresies, being such as were, by the more ancient rule of truth, predicted as -- (one day) to happen. Now, the doctrine of Hermogenes has this -- (3) taint of novelty. He ...

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Chronicles of the City of Gotham

By: James Kirke Paulding

Excerpt: RIGHT WORSHIPFUL: It hath been from time immemorial a subject of contention among the learned, whether Osiris, Confucius, Zoroaster, Solon, Lycurgus, Draco, Numa Pompilius, Mahomet, Peter the Great, Napoleon Bonaparte, Jeremy Bentham, or the author of the New Charter of Gotham, was, or is the greatest lawgiver. Without diving into the abstruse profundity of this knotty question, I myself am of opinion that it may be easily settled, by putting them all out of sig...

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