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Earl of Ormond (Ireland)

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Title: Earl of Ormond (Ireland)  
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Subject: List of earldoms, Earl of Ossory, Butler dynasty, Thomas Butler, 10th Earl of Ormond, List of viscountcies in the peerages of Britain and Ireland
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Earl of Ormond (Ireland)

For the titles in the Peerage of Scotland see: Earl of Ormond (Scotland)
Arms of Butler, Earl & Marquess of Ormonde: Gules, three covered cups or. The Earls of Ormond however bore the arms of their ancestor Theobald Walter, 1st Baron Butler (died 1206) (Or, a chief indented azure) in the 1st quarter[1]
James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde.
Bookplate by Henry Badeley showing the coat of arms of the Butlers, Earls of Ormonde: Quarterly 1st: Or, a chief indented azure (Walter); 2nd: Gules, three covered cups or (Butler); 3rd: Argent, a lion rampant gules on a chief of the second a swan close argent between two annulets or (Carrick); 4th: Ermine, a saltire gules[2]

The George having been executed for treason.

As a reward for his patriotism and generosity, Piers Butler, a cousin of the 7th Earl, was created Earl of Ossory five days after resigning his rights to the other titles. The third creation for Piers Butler (in 1538) merely recognised the reality of the situation prior to the Boleyn eruption. The fifth earl of this creation was made Marquess of Ormonde (1642) and Duke of Ormonde (1660) in the Peerage of Ireland, and Duke of Ormonde (1682) in the Peerage of England.

Contents

  • Other titles held by the earls 1
  • Earls of Ormond; First creation (1328) 2
  • Earls of Ormond; Second creation (1529) 3
  • Earls of Ormond; Reversion to First creation (1538) 4
  • Dukes of Ormonde (1661 Ireland and 1682 England) 5
  • Earls of Ormonde; Third creation (1538; Reverted) 6
  • Marquesses of Ormonde (1816) 7
  • Earls of Ormonde; Third creation (1538; Reverted) 8
  • Marquesses of Ormonde (1825) 9
  • Earls of Ormonde and Ossory (1328/1538; Reverted) 10
  • See also 11
  • References 12
  • External links 13

Other titles held by the earls

Prior to the creation of the Earldom of Ormond, the 1st earl's father had been created the first Earl of Carrick. However, this title did not pass to James Butler. After a gap of 7 years following his father's death, James was rewarded with an earldom in his own right – Ormond. After 1682, the spelling "Ormonde" was used almost universally. Subsidiary titles for the duke were Earl of Brecknock (1660) and Baron Butler (1660) in the Peerage of England and Earl of Ormond (1328), Earl of Ossory (1538) and Viscount Thurles (1536) in the Peerage of Ireland. In 1715 the second duke was attainted and his English peerages declared forfeit. In 1758 the de jure third duke (Irish) died and the dukedom and marquessate became extinct. The eleventh earl was created the Marquess of Ormonde in the Peerage of Ireland in 1816, on his death that title became extinct and the earldoms passed to his brother, for whom the title Marquess of Ormonde was created in the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1825. That title became extinct in 1997, while the earldom became dormant.

An unrelated Earldom of Ormonde was twice created in the Peerage of Scotland.

Earls of Ormond; First creation (1328)

Earls of Ormond; Second creation (1529)

Earls of Ormond; Reversion to First creation (1538)

Dukes of Ormonde (1661 Ireland and 1682 England)

Earls of Ormonde; Third creation (1538; Reverted)

Marquesses of Ormonde (1816)

Earls of Ormonde; Third creation (1538; Reverted)

Marquesses of Ormonde (1825)

Earls of Ormonde and Ossory (1328/1538; Reverted)

The presumed successors of the 7th marquess in the Earldoms of Ormonde and Ossory have been the 17th and 18th Viscounts Mountgarret, descending in the male line from a younger son of the 8th Earl, but the claim has not been proved, because the possibility of male descendants of sons of the 9th earl has not been ruled out.

See also

References

  1. ^ Debrett's Peerage, 1968, p.864
  2. ^ Debrett's Peerage, 1968, p.864
  • Leigh Rayment's Peerage Pages

External links

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