World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Brahms guitar

 

Brahms guitar


Commonly referred to as the Cello-Guitar, the Brahms guitar was invented in 1994 by classical guitarist Paul Galbraith in collaboration with the luthier David Rubio. It was originally conceived in order to perform Johannes Brahms' Theme and Variations Opus 21a.

The instrument is an eight string guitar, adding both a high and a low string to the conventional six string guitar. The tuning continues in fourths and the frets are splayed to allow for the different string lengths.

Galbraith's method is to play the Brahms guitar in the cello position adding greater freedom to both hands and incorporating a resonating box.

Other practitioners include Everton Gloeden and Luiz Mantovani of the Brazilian Guitar Quartet and Galbraith's former students Redmond O'Toole and Matthew Korbanic. The Brahms guitar is also in use by the Dublin Guitar Quartet who use the instrument in their arrangements of Philip Glass, Kevin Volans[1] and Arvo Part string quartets.

References


See also

Sources

  • http://www.paul-galbraith.com/engl/8string.htm
  • http://www.redmondotoole.com/instrument.html
  • http://www.luth.org/memoriam/rubio.htm
  • http://erez-perelman.com/guitar/brahms.html
  • http://www.matthewkorbanic.com/

http://dublinguitarquartet.com

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 



Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from World Library are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.