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Eurovision Song Contest 1989

 

Eurovision Song Contest 1989

Eurovision Song Contest 1989
Dates
Final date 6 May 1989
Host
Venue Palais de Beaulieu
Lausanne, Switzerland
Presenter(s) Jacques Deschenaux
Lolita Morena
Conductor Benoit Kaufman
Director Alain Bloch
Charles-André Grivet
Executive supervisor Frank Naef
Host broadcaster SRG SSR idée suisse (SRG SSR)
Opening act Celine Dion singing "Ne partez pas sans moi" and "Where Does My Heart Beat Now"
Interval act Guy Tell
Participants
Number of entries 22
Debuting countries None
Returning countries  Cyprus
Withdrawing countries None
Vote
Voting system Each country awarded 12, 10, 8-1 points to their 10 favourite songs
Nul points  Iceland
Winning song  Yugoslavia
"Rock Me"
Eurovision Song Contest
◄1988 1989 1990►

The Eurovision Song Contest 1989 was the 34th annual Eurovision Song Contest. It was held on 6 May 1989 in Lausanne, Switzerland, after Celine Dion's victory in Dublin the previous year. The program was presented by Lolita Morena and Jacques Deschenaux. Riva, representing Yugoslavia, won with the song Rock Me. This was the only victory for Yugoslavia as a unified state.[1]

The United Kingdom's Ray Caruana, lead singer with Live Report was outspoken about coming second to what he considered a much less worthy song.[2] They had been defeated by 7 points.

Two of the performers, Nathalie Pâque and Gili Natanael were respectively 11 and 12 years old at their time of competing. Due to bad publicity surrounding their participation, the European Broadcasting Union introduced the rule stating no performer is allowed to take part before the year of their 16th birthday.[3]

The previous year's winner, Celine Dion, opened the show with a live performance of her winning song and a mimed performance of her first English-language single, "Where Does My Heart Beat Now". The song went on to become a top ten hit in the US a year later - effectively launching her into international success.[1]

Contents

  • Results 1
  • Voting structure 2
  • Score sheet 3
    • 12 points 3.1
  • Commentators 4
    • Television 4.1
    • Radio 4.2
  • Spokespersons 5
  • National jury members 6
  • References 7

Results

Draw Country Language[4] Artist Song English translation Place Points
01  Italy Italian Anna Oxa & Fausto Leali "Avrei voluto" I would've wanted 9 56
02  Israel Hebrew Gili and Galit "Derekh Hamelekh" (דרך המלך) The king's road 12 50
03  Ireland English Kiev Connolly & The Missing Passengers "The Real Me" 18 21
04  Netherlands Dutch Justine Pelmelay "Blijf zoals je bent" Stay the way you are 15 45
05  Turkey Turkish Pan "Bana Bana" To me, to me 21 5
06  Belgium Dutch Ingeborg "Door de wind" Through the wind 19 13
07  United Kingdom English Live Report "Why Do I Always Get it Wrong?" 2 130
08  Norway Norwegian Britt Synnøve Johansen "Venners nærhet" The closeness of friends 17 30
09  Portugal Portuguese Da Vinci "Conquistador" Conqueror 16 39
10  Sweden Swedish Tommy Nilsson "En dag" One Day 4 110
11  Luxembourg French Park Café "Monsieur" Mister 20 8
12  Denmark Danish Birthe Kjær "Vi maler byen rød" We're painting the town red 3 111
13  Austria German Thomas Forstner "Nur ein Lied" Just a song 5 97
14  Finland Finnish Anneli Saaristo "La dolce vita" The good life 7 76
15  France French Nathalie Pâque "J'ai volé la vie" I stole life 8 60
16  Spain Spanish Nina "Nacida para amar" Born to love 6 88
17  Cyprus Greek Fani Polymeri & Yiannis Savvidakis "Apopse As Vrethoume"
(Απόψε ας βρεθούμε)
Let's meet tonight 11 51
18   Switzerland Romansh Furbaz "Viver senza tei" To live without you 13 47
19  Greece Greek Mariana Efstratiou "To Diko Sou Asteri"
(Το δικό σου αστέρι)
Your own star 9 56
20  Iceland Icelandic Daníel Ágúst Haraldsson "Það sem enginn sér" What no one sees 22 0
21  Germany German Nino de Angelo "Flieger" Flyers 14 46
22  Yugoslavia Croatian Riva "Rock Me" 1 137

Voting structure

Each country had a jury who awarded 12, 10, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 points for their top ten songs.

Score sheet

Juries
Total Score Italy Israel Ireland Netherlands Turkey Belgium United Kingdom Norway Portugal Sweden Luxembourg Denmark Austria Finland France Spain Cyprus Switzerland Greece Iceland Germany Yugoslavia
Contestants Italy 56 7 10 12 6 2 4 7 8
Israel 50 1 7 3 2 5 5 5 7 5 3 7
Ireland 21 7 3 3 2 4 2
Netherlands 45 10 3 3 1 4 4 7 6 1 6
Turkey 5 1 4
Belgium 13 5 5 2 1
United Kingdom 130 6 7 4 7 1 12 12 10 12 1 8 6 12 10 2 2 12 6
Norway 30 2 2 5 8 2 6 4 1
Portugal 39 4 2 1 3 7 6 2 8 6
Sweden 110 6 6 4 8 8 6 12 12 2 5 8 3 8 2 8 12
Luxembourg 8 5 3
Denmark 111 5 1 10 12 6 4 10 10 2 12 3 7 12 6 10 1
Austria 97 12 8 3 12 7 4 1 2 10 8 12 8 5 5
Finland 76 10 8 6 10 1 4 4 3 10 7 3 10
France 60 3 5 6 4 5 1 8 3 5 3 7 5 2 3
Spain 88 8 2 7 7 4 10 8 8 4 10 10 10
Cyprus 51 2 3 1 6 6 8 2 4 7 12
Switzerland 47 4 4 10 8 8 3 2 1 7
Greece 56 1 1 5 6 10 1 4 12 12 4
Iceland 0
Germany 46 7 2 5 1 5 6 7 1 6 3 3
Yugoslavia 137 12 12 8 12 10 12 7 4 8 5 10 10 7 3 5 5 6 1

12 points

Below is a summary of all 12 points in the final:

N. Contestant Voting nation
5 United Kingdom France, Germany, Luxembourg, Norway, Portugal
4 Yugoslavia Ireland, Israel, Turkey, United Kingdom
3 Austria Belgium, Greece, Italy
Denmark Finland, Netherlands, Sweden
Sweden Austria, Denmark, Yugoslavia
2 Greece Cyprus, Switzerland
1 Cyprus Iceland
Italy Spain

Commentators

Spokespersons

National jury members

References

  1. ^ a b "Eurovision Song Contest 1989". Eurovision.tv. Retrieved 8 July 2013. 
  2. ^ "Grand Final: 1989". BBC.co.uk. Retrieved 8 July 2013. 
  3. ^ O'Connor, John Kennedy (2010). The "Eurovision Song Contest": The Official History. Carlton Books Ltd.  
  4. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1989". The Diggiloo Thrush. Retrieved 5 March 2012. 
  5. ^ "Anna Oxa e Fausto Leali Avrei voluto Eurofestival 1989". YouTube. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  6. ^ "Welkom op de site van Eurovision Artists". Eurovisionartists.nl. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  7. ^ Adriaens, Manu & Loeckx-Van Cauwenberge, Joken. Blijven kiken!. Lannoo, Belgium. 2003 ISBN 90-209-5274-9
  8. ^ "La Yougoslavie Decroche L'Eurovision". Archives.lesoir.be. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  9. ^ Eurovision Song Contest 1989 BBC Archives
  10. ^ "Hvem kommenterte før Jostein Pedersen? - Debattforum". Nrk.no. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  11. ^ a b "Comentadores Do ESC - escportugalforum.pt.vu | o forum eurovisivo português". 21595.activeboard.com. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  12. ^ a b c "Infosajten.com". Infosajten.com. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  13. ^ a b Christian Masson. "1989 - Lausanne". Songcontest.free.fr. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  14. ^ a b "Forside". esconnet.dk. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  15. ^ [2] Archived October 24, 2007 at the Wayback Machine
  16. ^ "Selostajat ja taustalaulajat läpi vuosien? • Viisukuppila". Viisukuppila.fi. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  17. ^ "FORO FESTIVAL DE EUROVISIÓN • Ver Tema - Uribarri comentarista Eurovision 2010". Eurosongcontest.phpbb3.es. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  18. ^ a b Savvidis, Christos (OGAE Cyprus)
  19. ^ "Η Δάφνη Μπόκοτα και η EUROVISION (1987-2004)". Retromaniax.gr. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  20. ^ a b "Söngvakeppnin: Fjórir valdir til að syngja bakraddir". Mbl.is. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  21. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 1989". Ecgermany.de. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  22. ^ "פורום אירוויזיון". Sf.tapuz.co.il. 1999-09-13. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  23. ^ Video on YouTube
  24. ^ Dyrseth, Seppo (OGAE Norway)
  25. ^ "Selostajat ja taustalaulajat läpi vuosien? • Viisukuppila". Viisukuppila.fi. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  26. ^ "Concours Eurovision de la Chanson • Consulter le sujet - Porte-paroles des jurys des pays francophones". Eurovision.vosforums.com. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  27. ^ Baumann, Peter Ramón (OGAE Switzerland)
  28. ^ "Εκφωνητές της ΕΡΤ για τις ψήφους της Ελλάδας στην EUROVISION - Page 3". Retromaniax.gr. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
  29. ^ "000webhost.com - free web hosting provider". Eurofestival.host22.com. Retrieved 2012-08-10. 
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