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Legion of Honor (museum)

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Legion of Honor (museum)

Legion of Honor
Location 100 34th Avenue, San Francisco, California, USA
Coordinates
Type Art museum
Visitors 177,608 (2010) [1]
Public transit access San Francisco Municipal Railway
Website http://legionofhonor.famsf.org/

The Legion of Honor (formerly known as the The California Palace of the Legion of Honor) is a part of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco[2] (FAMSF). The name is used both for the museum collection and for the building in which it is housed. As of 2014, its director is Colin Bailey.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Collections 2
  • Symphonic organ 3
  • Gallery 4
  • Film appearances 5
  • See also 6
  • References 7
  • External links 8

History

Statue of El Cid silhouetted by a solar corona in front of the Legion.

The Legion of Honor was the gift of Panama Pacific International Exposition, which in turn was a three-quarter-scale version of the Palais de la Légion d'Honneur also known as the Hôtel de Salm in Paris, by Pierre Rousseau (1782). At the close of the exposition, which was located just a few miles away, the French government granted Spreckels permission to construct a permanent replica of the French Pavilion, but World War I delayed the groundbreaking until 1921.[4]

The museum building occupies an elevated site in Lincoln Park in the northwest of the city, with views over the Golden Gate Bridge. Most of the surrounding Lincoln Park Golf Course is on the site of a potter's field called the "Golden Gate Cemetery" that the City had bought in 1867. The cemetery was closed in 1908 and the bodies were relocated to Colma. During seismic retrofitting in the 1990s, however, coffins and skeletal remains were unearthed.[5]

The plaza and fountain in front of the Palace of the Legion of Honor is the western terminus of the Lincoln Highway, the first improved road for automobiles across America. The terminus marker and an interpretive plaque are located in the southwest corner of the plaza and fountain, just to the left of the Palace.

Collections

The Legion of Honor displays a collection spanning more than 6,000 years of ancient and European art and houses the Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts in a neoclassical building overlooking Lincoln Park and the Golden Gate Bridge.

European Art

The museum contains a representative collection of European art, the largest portion of which is French. Its most distinguished collection is of Seurat, Cézanne and others. There are also representative works by key 20th century figures such as Braque and Picasso, and works of contemporary artists like Gottfried Helnwein and Robert Crumb.

The Grand Canal, Venice, 1908 by Claude Monet.
Collection Highlights

Symphonic organ

The symphonic organ.

In 1924, Gravissima and a 32-foot Bourdon Profunda, in addition to the final Traps that were enclosed in the Choir: Bass drum, castanets, Chinese block, crash cymbal, gong snare drum (f), snare drum (ff), and a tambourine triangle.

Gallery

Film appearances

  • The Palace is seen in the Alfred Hitchcock movie Vertigo (1958) when Scottie follows Madeleine Elster to the museum, where she stares at one painting for a considerable time. This painting, the one dubbed 'Beautiful Carlotta' was a prop created specifically for the production and is not housed at the museum.
  • The Palace appears in the Tales of the City (TV miniseries) based on the first of the Tales of the City series of novels by Armistead Maupin. The character of Mary Ann Singleton (played by Laura Linney) arranges to meet her neighbor Norman Neal Williams (played by Stanley DeSantis) at the museum, where he meets his fate.
  • The character Dr. Crippen in the spoof Maltese Falcon sequel The Black Bird has an office in the Palace.

See also

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^

External links

  • Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco – Legion of Honor page
  • Photograph of Hôtel de Salm, Paris
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