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Managerial economics

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Title: Managerial economics  
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Subject: Klaus Schnellenkamp, Business economics, Microeconomics, Economics, Economy
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Managerial economics

Managerial economics is the "application of the economic concepts and economic analysis to the problems of formulating rational managerial decisions".[1] It is sometimes referred to as business economics and is a branch of economics that applies microeconomic analysis to decision methods of businesses or other management units. As such, it bridges economic theory and economics in practice.[2] It draws heavily from quantitative techniques such as regression analysis, correlation and calculus.[3] If there is a unifying theme that runs through most of managerial economics, it is the attempt to optimize business decisions given the firm's objectives and given constraints imposed by scarcity, for example through the use of operations research, mathematical programming, game theory for strategic decisions,[4] and other computational methods.[5]

Managerial decision areas include:

  • assessment of investible funds
  • selecting business area
  • choice of product
  • determining optimum output
  • determining price of product
  • determining input-combination and technology
  • sales promotion.

Almost any business decision can be analyzed with managerial economics techniques, but it is most commonly applied to:

At universities, the subject is taught primarily to advanced undergraduates and graduate business schools. It is approached as an integration subject. That is, it integrates many concepts from a wide variety of prerequisite courses. In many countries it is possible to read for a degree in Business Economics which often covers managerial economics, financial economics, game theory, business forecasting and industrial economics.

Contents

  • Scope 1
  • Demand decision 2
  • See also 3
  • Notes 4
  • References 5
  • Journals 6
  • External links 7

Scope

Managerial economics to a certain degree is prescriptive in nature as it suggests course of action to a managerial problem. Problems can be related to various departments in a firm like production, accounts, sales, etc.

  1. Demand decision.
  2. Production decision.
  3. Theory of exchange or price theory.
  4. All human economic activitiy

Demand decision

Demand refers to the willingness to buy a commodity. Demand, here, defines the market size for a commodity i.e. who will buy the commodity. Analysis of the demand is important for a firm as its revenue, profits, income of the employees depend on it.[8] Demand>> willingness and able to purchase. We have the will and power to purchase anything is demand. Not only willing or only ability to purchase something called demand. information technology

See also

Notes

  1. ^ W. B. Allen, K.Weigelt, N. Doherty, and E. Mansfield, 2009. Managerial Economics Theory, Applications, and Cases, 7th Edition. Norton. Contents.
  2. ^ William J. Baumol (1961). "What Can Economic Theory Contribute to Managerial Economics?," American Economic Review, 51(2), pp. 142-46. Abstract.
       • Ivan Png and Dale Lehman (2007, 3rd ed.). Managerial Economics. Wiley. Description and chapter-preview links.
       • M. L. Trivedi (2002). Managerial Economics: Theory & Applications, 2nd ed., Tata McGraw-Hill. Chapter-preview links.
  3. ^ NA (2009). "managerial economics," Encyclopedia Britannica. Cached online entry.
  4. ^ Carl Shapiro (1989). "The Theory of Business Strategy," RAND Journal of Economics, 20(1), pp. 125-137.
       • Thomas J. Webster (2003). Managerial Economics: Theory and Practice, ch. 13 & 14, Academic Press. Description.
  5. ^ For a journal on the last subject, see Computational Economics, including an Aims & Scope link.
  6. ^ • James O. Berger (2008)."statistical decision theory," The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics, 2nd Edition. Abstract.
       • Keisuke Hirano (2008). "decision theory in econometrics," The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics, 2nd Edition. Abstract.
       • Vassilis A. Hajivassiliou (2008). "computational methods in econometrics," The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics, 2nd Edition. Abstract.
  7. ^ • Trefor Jones (2004). Business Economics and Managerial Decision Making, Wiley. Description and chapter-preview links.
       • Nick Wilkinson (2005). Managerial Economics: A Problem-Solving Approach, Cambridge University Press. Description and preview.
       • Maria Moschandreas (2000). Business Economics, 2nd Edition, Thompson Learning. Description and chapter-preview links.
  8. ^ Prof. M.S. BHAT, and A.V. RAU.Managerial economics and financial analysis.Hyderabad.ISBN 978-81-7800-153-1

References

Journals

  • Computational Economics. Aims and scope.
  • International Journal of Economics and Management Sciences
  • Journal of Economics & Management Strategy. Aims and scope.
  • Managerial and Decision Economics

External links

1. http://www.edushareonline.in/Management/eco%20new.pdf 2.http://www.swlearning.com/economics/hirschey/managerial_econ/chap01.pdf

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