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Sue Ane Langdon

Sue Ane Langdon
Langdon in 1958
Born Sue Lookhoff
(1936-03-08) 8 March 1936
Paterson, New Jersey, U.S.
Other names
  • Sue Anne Langdon
  • Sue Ann Langdon
Occupation Actress
Years active 1959–1991
Spouse(s) Jack Emrek (m. 1959; wid. 2010)
Awards

Sue Ane Langdon (born Sue Lookhoff; March 8, 1936) is an American actress. She began her performing career singing at Radio City Music Hall and acting in stage productions. In the mid-1960s, she appeared in the Broadway musical The Apple Tree,[1] which starred Alan Alda.

In 1976, she appeared in Hello Dolly at The Little Theatre on the Square.[2] She was featured in many comedies as well as the occasional dramatic film. She appeared in a pair of Elvis Presley movies, Roustabout and Frankie and Johnny. Her starring role on Arnie won her a Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress - Television.

Contents

  • Biography 1
    • Early life 1.1
    • Career 1.2
  • Personal life 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Biography

Early life

Langdon was born in Paterson, New Jersey to Albert G. Lookhoff (February 26, 1901 – May 1, 1938) and Grace (née Huddle; January 12, 1908 – November 21, 1980). Grace Lookhoff, an operatic soprano, studied music at Washington University in Saint Louis and Juilliard. Her opera performances, beginning with her New York debut in Lewisohn Stadium, included appearances with the Cleveland Orchestra, the Three Choirs Festival (Worcester, Massachusetts), the Coolidge Festival (Washington, D.C.), and the Saint Louis Municipal Opera. Grace's teaching career indicates a timeline of where her daughter grew up.

Sue Ane was enrolled at the University of North Texas. She was also briefly enrolled full-time at Idaho State University.[3]

Career

Langdon's film debut came in The Evictors (1979), Without Warning (1980), Zapped! (1982), and UHF (1989).

Langdon with Andy Griffith, 1962.

Langdon was the third actress to play Alice Kramden in Jackie Gleason's The Honeymooners sketches and shows, preceded by Pert Kelton and Audrey Meadows and followed by Sheila MacRae and Meadows again. She shared a Life magazine cover with Gleason, but played the role only briefly in the 1960s version, during the American Scene Magazine era, before MacRae took the role over for the color hour-long musical versions.[5]

She appeared as Kitty Marsh during the NBC portion (1959–1961) of Bachelor Father. The next year, she appeared twice on Rod Cameron's syndicated crime drama COronado 9. In 1961 she made her first of three appearances on Perry Mason as Rowena Leach in "The Case of the Crying Comedian". In 1962, she appeared as nurse Mary Simpson in an episode of CBS's The Andy Griffith Show and as Kate Tassel in The "Catawomper" episode of Gunsmoke. She made her second guest appearance on Perry Mason in 1964 as murder victim Bonnie in "The Case of the Scandalous Sculptor." She made guest appearances on Bourbon Street Beat, Room for One More, Mannix, Thriller, Bonanza, Ironside, McHale's Navy, Banacek, The Wild Wild West, The Dick Van Dyke Show, Three's Company and Happy Days.

Langdon was presented one of the Golden Boot Awards in 2003 for her contributions to western television and cinema.

Personal life

Sue Ane Lookhoff married Jack Emrek (born Robert J. Hanusek; 1920–2010) on April 4, 1959 in Las Vegas, Nevada.[6] The couple remained married until his death on April 27, 2010 in Calabasas, California. Emrek was a motion picture, stage and television director.[7]

References

  1. ^ "The Apple Tree".  
  2. ^ Shervey PhD, Beth; Palmer, Peter (2000). The Little Theatre on the Square: Four Decades of a Small-Town Equity Theatre.  
  3. ^ Alumni Records, Idaho State University
  4. ^ Lisanti, Tom (2001). Fantasy Femmes of 60's Cinema: Interviews with 20 Actresses from Biker, Beach, and Elvis Movies.  
  5. ^ "Sue Ane Langdon profile".  
  6. ^ [2], Nevada Marriage Index, 1956–2005, familysearch.org; accessed April 6, 2015.
  7. ^ "Actress Comes Home for Visit in Texas".  

External links

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